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Blackbeard's Pirates Be Hanged!
January 28, 1719: According to the log of HMS Pearl, whose sailors played a critical role in the November 1718 sea battle that killed Edward Thach near Ocracoke, N.C., two of the condemned pirates were taken from the ship and hanged on the Hampton, Virginia waterfront on this day.
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Blackbeards Pirates Be Hanged!
January 28, 1719: According to the log of HMS Pearl, whose sailors played a critical role in the November 1718 sea battle that killed Edward Thach near Ocracoke, N.C., two of the condemned pirates were taken from the ship and hanged on the Hampton, Virginia waterfront on this day.

On the 28th of January, 1687, Royal Navy ship the Drake sailed into Port Royal, with onlookers spotting four pirates hung from its yardarm as it approached. The pirates; Joseph Bannister and three of his crew.

Bannister had spent over six years as a merchant captain on the Golden Fleece, running trade from Jamaica to London, but after the Golden Fleece wrecked in 1684, Bannister fell in with the pirate crowd from Port Royal; as repairing his ship would be costly. He went out on the account, and Governor Molesworth of Jamaica would dispatch ships to track down Bannister, but he would remain elusive for years.

In time, Captain Spragg of the Drake would capture Bannister and his crew near the Mosquito Coast, finding them living alongside natives. Spragg had been given the right, from the governor, to try and convict Bannister on the way back to Port Royal if he ever were to catch him, as Bannister had become known for his trickery and had escaped from situations before.

Not long before arriving in Port Royal, Bannister and three of his men had their arms bound behind their backs, and were one at a time hanged from the yardarm. The sight of the ship arriving reportedly brought great joy to Governor Molesworth, with him writing a letter to London stating:

”It was a great spectacle of great satisfaction to all good people, and of terror to the favorers of pirates, the manner of his punishment being that which will most discourage others, which is why I empowered Captain Spragg to inflict it.”

(pictured are four pirates hanged from a ship’s rigging [from Black Sails], and a look at a depiction of Port Royal [from Drain the Sunken Pirate City])
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On the 28th of January, 1687, Royal Navy ship the Drake sailed into Port Royal, with onlookers spotting four pirates hung from its yardarm as it approached. The pirates; Joseph Bannister and three of his crew. 

Bannister had spent over six years as a merchant captain on the Golden Fleece, running trade from Jamaica to London, but after the Golden Fleece wrecked in 1684, Bannister fell in with the pirate crowd from Port Royal; as repairing his ship would be costly. He went out on the account, and Governor Molesworth of Jamaica would dispatch ships to track down Bannister, but he would remain elusive for years. 

In time, Captain Spragg of the Drake would capture Bannister and his crew near the Mosquito Coast, finding them living alongside natives. Spragg had been given the right, from the governor, to try and convict Bannister on the way back to Port Royal if he ever were to catch him, as Bannister had become known for his trickery and had escaped from situations before. 

Not long before arriving in Port Royal, Bannister and three of his men had their arms bound behind their backs, and were one at a time hanged from the yardarm. The sight of the ship arriving reportedly brought great joy to Governor Molesworth, with him writing a letter to London stating:

”It was a great spectacle of great satisfaction to all good people, and of terror to the favorers of pirates, the manner of his punishment being that which will most discourage others, which is why I empowered Captain Spragg to inflict it.”

(pictured are four pirates hanged from a ship’s rigging [from Black Sails], and a look at a depiction of Port Royal [from Drain the Sunken Pirate City])Image attachment

This is a great scientific discussion on human teeth compared to shark teeth! Fascinating work…..that we can learn from! ... See MoreSee Less

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Who knew?!

On the 27th of January, 1690, pirate Captain William Coward was sentenced to hang during trial. The unfortunately named Captain Coward was a minor pirate who operated off the coast of Massachusetts, formerly a sailor on the HMS Rose, and known for a single account of piracy involving a rowboat.

He and his three men, as their first act of piracy, brought a rowboat alongside a ketch named Elinor previously in November. Her crew, afflicted with smallpox, offered no resistance. The crew was robbed, the Elinor was taken, and Coward sailed it to Cape Cod. There the pirates were promptly caught and imprisoned.

He and his men were tried, alongside other imprisoned pirates Thomas Hawkins and Thomas Pound, and were sentenced to be hanged by the neck until dead. Despite William Coward arguing that this was illegal and that piracy could not be tried in common-law court, but would have to be dealt with in Admiralty court, which was impossible with the recently deposed Governor Andros, leaving no admiralty in the province.

He and his men would be visited by Cotton Mather and prayed with him while imprisoned, but before the time of execution would come around, he and his crew (along with Pound and Hawkins) would receive a reprieve and pardon from the newly established Governor Bradstreet. Coward is never mentioned again in known history.

(Pictured is the replica of the 1650 ketch Nonsuch, a rowboat alongside a ship, a picture of gallows, and the shores of Cape Cod)
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1924, just before the depression…..history and early film at its best! And yes, being Dutch, I do eat herring prepared all ways! Healthy and good for your coat……….. ... See MoreSee Less

Wonderful Pirate music to help get you ready to face your day! Me, I’m crawling underneath my boat today to do some repairs and inspections…gotta get ready for spring season! Stay Piratey my friends! Arrrggghhhhhh! ... See MoreSee Less

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All good boat captains have a selection of knots for running their lines…..here are some to learn and practice while sitting in front of the fire this weekend! Stay warm and drive safely…….. ... See MoreSee Less

Talk about history….when men were men and desperate! This was a job where getting lost at sea was common as sinking! Not for the frail for sure! ... See MoreSee Less

Underwater view of an old cannon from an unknown ship, on the ocean floor amid coral reef in the British Virgin Islands, Caribbean Sea - Photo by Pete Niesen, 2011 ... See MoreSee Less

Underwater view of an old cannon from an unknown ship, on the ocean floor amid coral reef in the British Virgin Islands, Caribbean Sea -  Photo by Pete Niesen, 2011

Nothing about sharks, but man’s history and evolution continues to amaze me! ... See MoreSee Less

Nothing about sharks, but man’s history and evolution continues to amaze me!

On the 26th of January, 1696, privateer Captain William Kidd received a commission to hunt pirates from King William III.

He had received his Letter of Marque from the Admiralty back on the 10th of December, and after receiving the commission, his ship the Adventure Galley would depart England later at the end of February 1696. In the commission, was a single stipulation:

“We do hereby jointly charge and command you, as you will answer the same at your utmost Peril, That you do not, in any manner, offend or molest any of our Friends or Allies, their Ships or Subjects.”

This was a stipulation Kidd would fail to follow later on, ending with him being deemed a pirate himself. The commission would also state pirates Kidd was being hired on to hunt, including Thomas Tew, John Ireland, and William Mayes, along with others; who had all violated the confines of their own Letters of Marque and consorted with pirates and the French.

(Pictured is a depiction of William Kidd by artist Howard Pyle, and the Letter of Marque issued to Kidd by King William III)
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On the 26th of January, 1696, privateer Captain William Kidd received a commission to hunt pirates from King William III.

He had received his Letter of Marque from the Admiralty back on the 10th of December, and after receiving the commission, his ship the Adventure Galley would depart England later at the end of February 1696. In the commission, was a single stipulation: 

“We do hereby jointly charge and command you, as you will answer the same at your utmost Peril, That you do not, in any manner, offend or molest any of our Friends or Allies, their Ships or Subjects.” 

This was a stipulation Kidd would fail to follow later on, ending with him being deemed a pirate himself. The commission would also state pirates Kidd was being hired on to hunt, including Thomas Tew, John Ireland, and William Mayes, along with others; who had all violated the confines of their own Letters of Marque and consorted with pirates and the French.

(Pictured is a depiction of William Kidd by artist Howard Pyle, and the Letter of Marque issued to Kidd by King William III)Image attachment

Something to think about and ponder……..On this day in 1748 two Spanish privateers captured the British schooner Sarah off Bear Inlet. The Spaniards were hoping to restock provisions but there were little to none on board the British vessel. They decided to surrender to English authorities at Brunswick Town instead of face starvation on their journey back to St. Augustine.
These types of attacks by the Spanish would lead the English to construct fortifications at nearby Bogue and Bear Inlets in order to protect shipping interests in the area.
Image: portion of a chart dated 1738, created by James Wimble, showing vicinity of coast between New River Inlet and Bogue Inlet.
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Something to think about and ponder……..

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THANKS CHARLIE.. ALL THE HISTORY AMAZES ME

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Fog Warning, 1885. Fisherman painting by Winslow Homer!
Some marine painters actually dared to go against the stream and started paint realism as they did see it!
The art went from ships of the line or battlepaintings, to describe the coastal life of a working man!
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Fog Warning, 1885. Fisherman painting by Winslow Homer!
Some marine painters actually dared to go against the stream and started paint realism as they did see it!
The art went from ships of the line or battlepaintings, to describe the coastal life of a working man!

Check this Shark fact out…..cooollll! ... See MoreSee Less

Many know Otway Burns from his privateering days during the War of 1812, but he was also responsible for the first steam vessel built in North Carolina. In 1818, the Prometheus was built in Swansboro and found its homeport in the Cape Fear navigating between Southport and Wilmington. You can find this cannon with Captain Otway Burns in the Old Burying Ground in Beaufort. Who doesn't want a cannon as a grave marker? #Cannons #Steamship #Maritime #Privateers #MaritimeViews ... See MoreSee Less

The Signalling Flare……indispensable for safety at sea…..history is great!THE INVENTOR OF THE SIGNALLING FLARE.

This is Martha Jane Coston (December 12, 1826 – July 9, 1904) who was an inventor and businesswoman best known for her invention of the Coston flare, a device for signalling at sea.

Her husband was an entrepreneur and set up a business for his inventions at the age of 16. He, unfortunately, died at the age of 24 leaving Martha and her 4 children behind.

Martha later found her husbands half-made plans for a night signalling device which, with incredible foresight, she saw the value in, and later turned into the flare. She battled for over a decade, there was much improvement to be made to the design and she had to fight hard to get the value of the flare recognised.

In 1859 she finally got the design patented, although inequalities of the time led to Martha filing under her late husband’s name.

The US navy put in an initial order of 300 flares and quickly followed it up with an additional $6,000 order (roughly £200,000 today). With this initial success behind her, she travelled to the UK and Europe to market and sell her flares around the world.

As well as general signalling, red flares became a primary means of signalling distress and as a result, over the last 160 years, Martha Coston's invention has helped save countless lives at sea.

It is thought that she was consistently dismissed and underpaid due to her gender despite her flares being one of the greatest inventions of the time. She once said she always had to be “ready to fight like a lioness” against chauvinism.

For more nautical trivia, follow our Facebook page!

If you want to know more about Martha Coston (and she lead an incredibly interesting life) she wrote a book called: A Signal Success: The work and Travels of Mrs Martha J. Coston. It’s a free downloadable eBook.

#ardenttraining #ThrowbackThursday #marthacoston #flares #costonflare #distresssignal #SavingLivesAtSea
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The Signalling Flare……indispensable for safety at sea…..history is great!

- Sharks and their Relations to Sailors -

A fairly common belief during the Age of Sail, dating as far back as the 15th century, was that if a shark followed a ship that it was a sign that someone on board was soon to die. This was part of an extension of the shark’s extraordinarily ability to smell blood in the water across vast distances; believing that sharks themselves could smell death. In 1705, it was noted by a slaver vessel from the coast of Africa, that “when our ships depart from those Places, they sometimes follow them for three Weeks or a month.”

While sharks did have their uses to sailors, such as skin and teeth as materials for crafts, not to mention serving as a meal, they could also pose difficulties when needing to leave the vessel in a small boat. To deter the creatures from the ship, a known practice was to suspend a severed shark fin, or tail from the bowsprit at the front of the ship. As the ship traveled, blood would drip to the ocean, a reminder to sharks nearby that something in the area has killed their kind, which supposedly led to them keeping a sizeable distance from the vessel. In a superstition that may be related, a sailor belief originating in either the 18th or 19th century mentions that a shark’s tail tacked to the bowsprit brings good luck to those on board.

As for a historic account of connecting pirates and sharks, sailor Philip Middletone, who was captured by the pirate Captain Henry Avery, noted in his account that one of his crew members had been killed by a shark; though he provides no real details on the event.

Shark tooth jewelry, such as necklaces, far predate the popularity craze of them among surfers in the 1960s; sailors have long worn them as part of superstition likely stemming from islander cultures dating back over a 1,000 years. Wearing a shark tooth while in open water was said to protect the sailor from shark attacks, and protect the wearer from drowning or getting lost at sea. In addition, shark teeth have long been a symbol of strength and masculinity. Shark teeth jewelry has been worn as far back as the 5th Century BCE, to 500 AD among the native Hawaiians, and even during the Middle Ages (a superstition said to protect the wearer from poison in foods and beverages) in Europe.

(Pictured is a shark fin jutting above the water’s surface and a shark underwater.
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- Sharks and their Relations to Sailors - 

A fairly common belief during the Age of Sail, dating as far back as the 15th century, was that if a shark followed a ship that it was a sign that someone on board was soon to die. This was part of an extension of the shark’s extraordinarily ability to smell blood in the water across vast distances; believing that sharks themselves could smell death. In 1705, it was noted by a slaver vessel from the coast of Africa, that “when our ships depart from those Places, they sometimes follow them for three Weeks or a month.”

While sharks did have their uses to sailors, such as skin and teeth as materials for crafts, not to mention serving as a meal, they could also pose difficulties when needing to leave the vessel in a small boat. To deter the creatures from the ship, a known practice was to suspend a severed shark fin, or tail from the bowsprit at the front of the ship. As the ship traveled, blood would drip to the ocean, a reminder to sharks nearby that something in the area has killed their kind, which supposedly led to them keeping a sizeable distance from the vessel. In a superstition that may be related, a sailor belief originating in either the 18th or 19th century mentions that a shark’s tail tacked to the bowsprit brings good luck to those on board.

As for a historic account of connecting pirates and sharks, sailor Philip Middletone, who was captured by the pirate Captain Henry Avery, noted in his account that one of his crew members had been killed by a shark; though he provides no real details on the event. 

Shark tooth jewelry, such as necklaces, far predate the popularity craze of them among surfers in the 1960s; sailors have long worn them as part of superstition likely stemming from islander cultures dating back over a 1,000 years. Wearing a shark tooth while in open water was said to protect the sailor from shark attacks, and protect the wearer from drowning or getting lost at sea. In addition, shark teeth have long been a symbol of strength and masculinity. Shark teeth jewelry has been worn as far back as the 5th Century BCE, to 500 AD among the native Hawaiians, and even during the Middle Ages (a superstition said to protect the wearer from poison in foods and beverages) in Europe. 

(Pictured is a shark fin jutting above the water’s surface and a shark underwater.Image attachment

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Love and appreciate your posts!! Thank you for sharing.

Today and tomorrow especially……”There is no such thing as bad weather…..only inappropriate clothing!” Stay warm out there!Fish Friday!
Some wind, rain, and maybe frozen stuff is in the forecast. We hope you have some good foul weather gear if you have to be on the water. Be safe out there!
Image: fisherman from Roanoke Island in rain slicker and hat leaning on rail of boat, late 1930s, from the Charles A. Farrell collection, North Carolina State Archives.
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Today and tomorrow especially……”There is no such thing as bad weather…..only inappropriate clothing!” Stay warm out there!

Better late than never! Many thanks to everyone!

Capt. Charlie’s Adventures and Capt. Charlie want to thank all our friends, clients, and family for making the crazy year of 2021 an absolutely great year and here in early 2022 I am finally putting the “TAC” to Dock for the months of February and March….gotta get her ready for the upcoming season which is already shaping up to be a banner one and a very busy year! Personally I am doing much better after some great health care and a lot of my leg and foot issues are much better and I am definitely more pain free than I’ve been in the past two years! With all this Covid mess, I feel really blessed to work in the healthiest environment known to man. Sunshine heals a lot of wounds and is great for the soul……

And this year I will be able to run like a demon and I have some changes planned to help me provide even better quality trips for all my friends and families.

Soooooo, for the rest of 2022’s winter, I’m going to work on the boat, enjoy my fireplace, and keep getting myself in better shape! I’ll still post pictures, stories, and educational studies on our wonderful water world here in SENCland and the world. That way I can keep you up to date on my activities and future plans for our Adventures!

If you have suggestions, thoughts, or want to critique my efforts,….please do so. If there is something you are interested in, let me know and I’ll try to expand my fields. Kids tell me more pirate stuff! Thanks for your concerns and interest………so let’s get rolling with a very cool shark tooth fact! Neat,…huh?
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Better late than never! Many thanks to everyone!

Capt. Charlie’s Adventures and Capt. Charlie want to thank all our friends, clients, and family for making the crazy year of 2021 an absolutely great year and here in early 2022 I am finally putting the “TAC” to Dock for the months of February and March….gotta get her ready for the upcoming season which is already shaping up to be a banner one and a very busy year! Personally I am doing much better after some great health care and a lot of my leg and foot issues are much better and I am definitely more pain free than I’ve been in the past two years! With all this Covid mess, I feel really blessed to work in the healthiest environment known to man. Sunshine heals a lot of wounds and is great for the soul……

And this year I will be able to run like a demon and I have some changes planned to help me provide even better quality trips for all my friends and families. 

Soooooo, for the rest of 2022’s winter, I’m going to work on the boat, enjoy my fireplace, and keep getting myself in better shape! I’ll  still post pictures, stories, and educational studies on our wonderful water world here in SENCland and the world. That way I can keep you up to date on my activities and future plans for our Adventures!

If you have suggestions, thoughts, or want to critique my efforts,….please do so. If there is something you are interested in, let me know and I’ll try to expand my fields. Kids tell me more pirate stuff! Thanks for your concerns and interest………so let’s get rolling with a very cool shark tooth fact! Neat,…huh?

On the 21st of January, 1663, Christopher Myngs set sail from Port Royal. With twenty vessels strong, a force of about 1,000 pirates spread out over fourteen ships of the twenty; all bound for the Spanish Main.

Christopher Myngs was the British Naval Commander of Jamaica, who was the captain of the Centurio; and prior to the 21st he had put out a call to all buccaneers in the Caribbean with the promise of “looting, violence and rape, of which England would look the other way.” The idea was to sack Campeche, on the coast of the Yucatan, but England didn’t have the forces capable of doing so… So in times of need, they called upon the buccaneers to assemble and greatly bolster their numbers.

The fleet would include already well-known pirates, such as Captain Henry Morgan, Abraham Blauvelt, and Edward Mansvelt. The fleet total, would be the largest pirate fleet ever assembled thus far; including pirates from the French, Dutch, and English all working in unison against Spain.

The following month, the fleet would arrive to plunder the Spanish city.

(Pictured is a collection of ships led by one flying an English flag [from Black Sails], a ship docked at a depiction of Port Royal [from Pirates of the Caribbean], and a look down from the crow’s nest of a Dutch vessel [the replica vessel Gotheborg])
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On the 21st of January, 1663, Christopher Myngs set sail from Port Royal. With twenty vessels strong, a force of about 1,000 pirates spread out over fourteen ships of the twenty; all bound for the Spanish Main. 

Christopher Myngs was the British Naval Commander of Jamaica, who was the captain of the Centurio; and prior to the 21st he had put out a call to all buccaneers in the Caribbean with the promise of “looting, violence and rape, of which England would look the other way.” The idea was to sack Campeche, on the coast of the Yucatan, but England didn’t have the forces capable of doing so… So in times of need, they called upon the buccaneers to assemble and greatly bolster their numbers. 

The fleet would include already well-known pirates, such as Captain Henry Morgan, Abraham Blauvelt, and Edward Mansvelt. The fleet total, would be the largest pirate fleet ever assembled thus far; including pirates from the French, Dutch, and English all working in unison against Spain.

The following month, the fleet would arrive to plunder the Spanish city.

(Pictured is a collection of ships led by one flying an English flag [from Black Sails], a ship docked at a depiction of Port Royal [from Pirates of the Caribbean], and a look down from the crow’s nest of a Dutch vessel [the replica vessel Gotheborg])Image attachmentImage attachment

Multiple grenades recovered from the Whydah shipwreck site, from pirate Captain Sam Bellamy's 1717 ship. The iron grenades of the eighteenth century were cast in molds and filled with an explosive mixture of saltpeter (potassium nitrate), Sulphur, and finely ground charcoal; and were ignited by a slow burning cloth or paper fuse threaded through a wooden plug. Grenades of similar make have been discovered at the shipwreck sites of Blackbeard's Queen Anne's Revenge, and the HMS Invincible. ... See MoreSee Less

Multiple grenades recovered from the Whydah shipwreck site, from pirate Captain Sam Bellamys 1717 ship. The iron grenades of the eighteenth century were cast in molds and filled with an explosive mixture of saltpeter (potassium nitrate), Sulphur, and finely ground charcoal; and were ignited by a slow burning cloth or paper fuse threaded through a wooden plug. Grenades of similar make have been discovered at the shipwreck sites of Blackbeards Queen Annes Revenge, and the HMS Invincible.Image attachmentImage attachment

Got my fire going for Snowmageeddon! Going to have some soup for dinner, prop my foot up, and watch the world go by…..y’all be careful out there…. ... See MoreSee Less

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Looks lovely, but we're really enjoying Sayulia, Mexico and the 80°here.

Stay safe love those cats!!

I love your f̵i̵r̵e̵d̵o̵g̵s̵ firecats! Stay warm Cap.

Awesome fireplace!

Capt. Charlie’s Adventures sounds like a prefect adventure to me! Enjoy and don’t dose off and miss the world 🌍 🌎 turning.

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Lanease Scott, just got to my chair and look at the book waiting on me! Seths book on N C Pirates! See you and Andrew soon! ... See MoreSee Less

Lanease Scott, just got to my chair and look at the book waiting on me! Seths book on N C Pirates! See you and Andrew soon!

Yup, getting ready to put my foot up! ... See MoreSee Less

Yup, getting ready to put my foot up!Image attachment

For 13 thousand dollars, Englishman Brandon Grimshaw bought a tiny uninhabited island in the Seychelles and moved there forever. When the Englishman Brandon Grimshaw was under forty, he quit his job as a newspaper editor and started a new life.
By this time, no human had set foot on the island for 50 years. As befits a real Robinson, Brandon found himself a companion from among the natives. His Friday name was René Lafortin. Together with Rene, Brandon began to equip his new home. While René came to the island only occasionally, Brandon lived on it for decades, never leaving. By oneself.
For 39 years, Grimshaw and Lafortin planted 16 thousand trees with their own hands and built almost 5 kilometers of paths. In 2007, Rene Lafortin died, and Brandon was left all alone on the island.
He was 81 years old. He attracted 2,000 new bird species to the island and introduced more than a hundred giant tortoises, which in the rest of the world (including the Seychelles) were already on the verge of extinction. Thanks to Grimshaw's efforts, the once deserted island now hosts two-thirds of the Seychelles' fauna. An abandoned piece of land has turned into a real paradise.
A few years ago, the prince of Saudi Arabia offered Brandon Grimshaw $50 million for the island, but Robinson refused. “I don’t want the island to become a favorite vacation spot for the rich. Better let it be a national park that everyone can enjoy.”
And he achieved that in 2008 the island was indeed declared a national park.
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For 13 thousand dollars, Englishman Brandon Grimshaw bought a tiny uninhabited island in the Seychelles and moved there forever. When the Englishman Brandon Grimshaw was under forty, he quit his job as a newspaper editor and started a new life.
By this time, no human had set foot on the island for 50 years. As befits a real Robinson, Brandon found himself a companion from among the natives. His Friday name was René Lafortin. Together with Rene, Brandon began to equip his new home. While René came to the island only occasionally, Brandon lived on it for decades, never leaving. By oneself.
For 39 years, Grimshaw and Lafortin planted 16 thousand trees with their own hands and built almost 5 kilometers of paths. In 2007, Rene Lafortin died, and Brandon was left all alone on the island.
He was 81 years old. He attracted 2,000 new bird species to the island and introduced more than a hundred giant tortoises, which in the rest of the world (including the Seychelles) were already on the verge of extinction. Thanks to Grimshaws efforts, the once deserted island now hosts two-thirds of the Seychelles fauna. An abandoned piece of land has turned into a real paradise.
A few years ago, the prince of Saudi Arabia offered Brandon Grimshaw $50 million for the island, but Robinson refused. “I don’t want the island to become a favorite vacation spot for the rich. Better let it be a national park that everyone can enjoy.”
And he achieved that in 2008 the island was indeed declared a national park.

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I love this guy!! What a great story.

AWESOME!!!

On the 20th of January, 1685, pirate Captain La Garde was sent by Laurens de Graaf to Curacao in search of repairs; who was denied entry.

Three days prior, on the 17th, pirates operating under the command of De Graaf had sailed southeast from Petite Goave to rejoin De Graaf along the shores of the Spanish Main, arriving at night. To their shock, they came to a 14-gun Spanish vessel. Calling out to the vessel as the sun began to gleam across the waves on the morning of the 18th, the vessel replied something in French; yet still flew Spanish flags. De Graaf’s men opened fire on the ship, pummeling her with cannonballs. The attack was called off however, once they realized Captain Laurens de Graaf was in command of the Spanish ship; a prize he had taken before the new year.

On the 20th, Laurens de Graaf dispatched one of the ships, under command of Pierre La Garde, probably with an audible sigh, to seek out replacement masts for repairs from Curacao. When La Garde arrived and requested to enter the harbor, in search of masts that had been ‘lost in a storm,’ the entry was “flatly refused.” However, many of the crew still managed to slip ashore in small boats and spent four days at the port drinking and enjoying revelry before they were driven out.

Crewmember Ravenau de Lussan, stated later that they had been denied entry for the repairs due to the two Dutch West Indiamen having been raided off Havana the year before by the pirates’ flotilla.

(Pictured are multiple ships firing upon a Spanish vessel [from Black Sails], the coastline of Curacao, and pirates enjoying revelry in port [from Black Sails])
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On the 20th of January, 1685, pirate Captain La Garde was sent by Laurens de Graaf to Curacao in search of repairs; who was denied entry. 

Three days prior, on the 17th, pirates operating under the command of De Graaf had sailed southeast from Petite Goave to rejoin De Graaf along the shores of the Spanish Main, arriving at night. To their shock, they came to a 14-gun Spanish vessel. Calling out to the vessel as the sun began to gleam across the waves on the morning of the 18th, the vessel replied something in French; yet still flew Spanish flags. De Graaf’s men opened fire on the ship, pummeling her with cannonballs. The attack was called off however, once they realized Captain Laurens de Graaf was in command of the Spanish ship; a prize he had taken before the new year. 

On the 20th, Laurens de Graaf dispatched one of the ships, under command of Pierre La Garde, probably with an audible sigh, to seek out replacement masts for repairs from Curacao. When La Garde arrived and requested to enter the harbor, in search of masts that had been ‘lost in a storm,’ the entry was “flatly refused.” However, many of the crew still managed to slip ashore in small boats and spent four days at the port drinking and enjoying revelry before they were driven out. 

Crewmember Ravenau de Lussan, stated later that they had been denied entry for the repairs due to the two Dutch West Indiamen having been raided off Havana the year before by the pirates’ flotilla. 

(Pictured are multiple ships firing upon a Spanish vessel [from Black Sails], the coastline of Curacao, and pirates enjoying revelry in port [from Black Sails])Image attachmentImage attachment

"I wish you enough sun to keep your attitude bright.

I wish you enough rain to appreciate the sun more.

I wish you enough happiness to keep your spirit alive.

I wish you enough pain so that the smallest joys in life appear much bigger.

I wish you enough gain to satisfy your wanting.

I wish you enough loss to appreciate all that you possess.

I wish you enough hellos to get you through the final good-bye."
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I wish you enough sun to keep your attitude bright.

I wish you enough rain to appreciate the sun more.

I wish you enough happiness to keep your spirit alive.

I wish you enough pain so that the smallest joys in life appear much bigger.

I wish you enough gain to satisfy your wanting.

I wish you enough loss to appreciate all that you possess.

I wish you enough hellos to get you through the final good-bye.

No matter how long it lives, the Greatest Lion will eventually die miserably. That's the world! They may die young from injuries they sustained while defending their Pride. They may die old, enfeebled by age. At their Peak, they rule, chase other animals, catch, devour, gulp and leave their crumbs for hyenas. But age comes fast.
The old Lion can't hunt, can't kill or defend itself. It roams and roars until it runs out of luck. It will be cornered by the hyenas, nibbled at and eaten alive by them. They won't even let it die before it is dismembered.
Life is short. Power is ephemeral. I have seen it in lions. I have seen it in old people. Everyone who lives long enough will become very vulnerable at some point. Therefore, let us be humble. Help the sick, the weak, the vulnerable and most importantly never forget that we will leave the stage one day.
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No matter how long it lives, the Greatest Lion will eventually die miserably. Thats the world! They may die young from injuries they sustained while defending their Pride. They may die old, enfeebled by age. At their Peak, they rule, chase other animals, catch, devour, gulp and leave their crumbs for hyenas. But age comes fast. 
The old Lion cant hunt, cant kill or defend itself. It roams and roars until it runs out of luck. It will be cornered by the hyenas, nibbled at and eaten alive by them. They wont even let it die before it is dismembered. 
Life is short. Power is ephemeral. I have seen it in lions. I have seen it in old people. Everyone who lives long enough will become very vulnerable at some point. Therefore, let us be humble. Help the sick, the weak, the vulnerable and most importantly never forget that we will leave the stage one day.

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